Training for the Digital Markets Act (DMA)



Training program 1

Preparing for the Digital Markets Act (DMA), for EU and non-EU firms (tailored-made training).


Possible modules of the tailor-made training program


- Introduction to the Digital Markets Act (DMA).

- Subject matter and scope.

- Understanding the important definitions.

- What is ‘core platform service’, ‘online search engine’, ‘online social networking service’, and ‘video-sharing platform service’?


- What is a gatekeeper?

- Designation of gatekeepers.

- Review of the status of gatekeeper.

- Obligations for gatekeepers.

- Obligation for gatekeepers on interoperability of number-independent interpersonal communications services.

- Compliance with obligations for gatekeepers.

- Exemption for grounds of public health and public security.

- Reporting.

- Anti-circumvention provision (core platform services providers shall not segment, divide, subdivide, fragment or split those services through contractual, commercial, technical or any other means in order to circumvent the quantitative thresholds of the DMA).

- Obligation to inform about concentrations.

- Obligation of an audit.


- Opening of a market investigation.

- Market investigation for designating gatekeepers.

- Market investigation into systematic non-compliance.

- Market investigation into new services and new practices.


- The Compliance function - independent from the operational functions, with sufficient authority, stature and resources, and access to the management body.

- Non-compliance.

- Fines.


- The high-level group for the Digital Markets Act (‘the high-level group’).

- Request for a market investigation.


- What is extraterritoriality?

- Extraterritorial application of EU law.

- Risk and compliance management challenges for firms established in non-EU countries.


- Master plan and list of immediate actions, for firms established in EU and non-EU countries.


- Other new EU directives and regulations that introduce compliance challenges to EU and non-EU firms: The NIS 2 Directive, the European Cyber Resilience Act, the Digital Operational Resilience Act (DORA), the Critical Entities Resilience Directive (CER).


- Closing remarks.


Target Audience, duration.

We offer a 60-minute overview for the board of directors and senior management of EU and non-EU firms, tailored to their needs. We also offer 4 hours to one day training for risk and compliance teams, responsible for the implementation of the EU directives and regulations.


Instructor.

Our instructors are working professionals that have the necessary knowledge and experience in the fields in which they teach. They can lead full-time, part-time, and short-form programs that are tailored to your needs. You will always know up front who the instructor of the training program will be.

George Lekatis, General Manager of Cyber Risk GmbH, can also lead these training sessions. His background and some testimonials: https://www.cyber-risk-gmbh.com/George_Lekatis_Testimonials.pdf


Terms and conditions.

You may visit: https://www.cyber-risk-gmbh.com/Terms.html



Training program 2

Preparing for the Digital Services Act (DSA) and the Digital Markets Act (DMA), for EU and non-EU firms (tailored-made training).


Part 1: The Digital Services Act (DSA).


- Introduction to the Digital Services Act.

- Subject matter and scope.

- Understanding the important definitions.

- What is ‘mere conduit’ service, ‘caching’ service, ‘hosting’ service?

- What is ‘illegal content’?

- What is ‘online platform’, ‘online search engine’, and ‘dissemination to the public’?


- Mere conduit, when the service provider is not liable for the information transmitted or accessed?

- Caching, when the service provider is not liable for the automatic, intermediate and temporary storage of information?

- Hosting, when the service provider is not liable for the information stored at the request of a recipient of the service?


- Orders to act against illegal content, issued by EU national judicial or administrative authorities.

- Orders to provide information, issued by EU national judicial or administrative authorities.


- The new European Board for Digital Services ("Board") - an independent advisory group of Digital Services Coordinators on the supervision of providers of intermediary services.

- The structure and the tasks of the Board.


- The ‘single point of contact’ for providers of intermediary services, to enable them to communicate directly with Member States’ authorities, the European Commission and the Board for the application of this Regulation.

- Points of contact for recipients of the service.

- Legal representatives.


- Transparency reporting obligations for providers of intermediary services.


- Provisions applicable to providers of hosting services, including online platforms.

- The challenges with the ‘statement of reasons’.

- Notification of suspicions of criminal offences.

- Internal complaint-handling system.


- Who is a ‘trusted flagger’?

- Notices submitted by trusted flaggers have priority and are processed and decided upon without undue delay.

- Measures and protection against misuse.


- Transparency reporting obligations for providers of online platforms.

- Advertising on online platforms.

- Traceability of traders.

- Compliance by design.

- Right to information.


- Additional obligations for providers of very large online platforms and of very large online search engines.

- Very large online platforms and very large online search engines.

- Risk assessment.

- Mitigation of risks.

- Crisis response mechanism.

- Independent audit.

- The compliance function - independent from their operational functions, with sufficient authority, stature, resources, and access to the management body of the provider.

- Transparency reporting obligations.


- Due diligence obligations.

- Standards.

- Codes of conduct.

- Crisis protocols.


- Competent authorities and national Digital Services Coordinators.

- Powers and requirements for the Digital Services Coordinators.

- Penalties.

- Right to lodge a complaint.

- Activity reports.


- Competences, coordinated investigation and consistency mechanisms.

- Cross-border cooperation among Digital Services Coordinators.

- Joint investigations.


- Supervision, investigation, enforcement and monitoring in respect of providers of very large online platforms and of very large online search engines.

- Development of expertise and capabilities.

- Enforcement of obligations of providers of very large online platforms and of very large online search engines.

- Monitoring actions.

- Non-compliance.

- Fines.


- What is extraterritoriality?

- Extraterritorial application of EU law.

- Risk and compliance management challenges for firms established in non-EU countries.


- Master plan and list of immediate actions, for firms established in EU and non-EU countries.


- Other new EU directives and regulations that introduce compliance challenges to EU and non-EU firms: The NIS 2 Directive, the European Cyber Resilience Act, the Digital Operational Resilience Act (DORA), the Critical Entities Resilience Directive (CER).


- Closing remarks.


Part 2: The Digital Markets Act (DMA).


- Introduction to the Digital Markets Act (DMA).

- Subject matter and scope.

- Understanding the important definitions.

- What is ‘core platform service’, ‘online search engine’, ‘online social networking service’, and ‘video-sharing platform service’?


- What is a gatekeeper?

- Designation of gatekeepers.

- Review of the status of gatekeeper.

- Obligations for gatekeepers.

- Obligation for gatekeepers on interoperability of number-independent interpersonal communications services.

- Compliance with obligations for gatekeepers.

- Exemption for grounds of public health and public security.

- Reporting.

- Anti-circumvention provision (core platform services providers shall not segment, divide, subdivide, fragment or split those services through contractual, commercial, technical or any other means in order to circumvent the quantitative thresholds of the DMA).

- Obligation to inform about concentrations.

- Obligation of an audit.


- Opening of a market investigation.

- Market investigation for designating gatekeepers.

- Market investigation into systematic non-compliance.

- Market investigation into new services and new practices.


- The Compliance function - independent from the operational functions, with sufficient authority, stature and resources, and access to the management body.

- Non-compliance.

- Fines.


- The high-level group for the Digital Markets Act (‘the high-level group’).

- Request for a market investigation.


- What is extraterritoriality?

- Extraterritorial application of EU law.

- Risk and compliance management challenges for firms established in non-EU countries.


- Master plan and list of immediate actions, for firms established in EU and non-EU countries.


- Other new EU directives and regulations that introduce compliance challenges to EU and non-EU firms: The NIS 2 Directive, the European Cyber Resilience Act, the Digital Operational Resilience Act (DORA), the Critical Entities Resilience Directive (CER).


- Closing remarks.


Target Audience, duration.

We offer a 60-minute overview for the board of directors and senior management of EU and non-EU firms, tailored to their needs. We also offer 4 hours to one day training for risk and compliance teams, responsible for the implementation of the EU directives and regulations.


Instructor.

Our instructors are working professionals that have the necessary knowledge and experience in the fields in which they teach. They can lead full-time, part-time, and short-form programs that are tailored to your needs. You will always know up front who the instructor of the training program will be.

George Lekatis, General Manager of Cyber Risk GmbH, can also lead these training sessions. His background and some testimonials: https://www.cyber-risk-gmbh.com/George_Lekatis_Testimonials.pdf


Terms and conditions.

You may visit: https://www.cyber-risk-gmbh.com/Terms.html